Maternity

Maternal Mortality Statistics

287,000  women die each year – one every two minutes – from pregnancy related causes. Ninety-nine per cent of these deaths occur in developing countries.
 
The Word Health Organization (WHO) estimates that around 15 percent of all pregnant women worldwide will, at some point in their pregnancy, develop complications that require essential obstetric care, and one on five will require some kind of surgery. The percentage of women that die during pregnancy or before 42 days after termination of the pregnancy, the so called maternal mortality rate, shows the disastrous results of lacking obstetric facilities and health care in many developing countries and (post) conflict areas. 

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Mortality and Morbidity

The WHO has asserted that the most common causes of maternal mortality are puerperal sepsis (infections), haemorrhage (severe bleeding), complications caused by unsafe abortions, eclampsia and obstructed labour.
 
Despite the already high number of maternal mortality, for every maternal death 30 other women are expected to develop complications during gestation, birth or puerperium, so called maternal morbidity.

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Neonatal Mortality and Stillbirths

It is estimated that every year around 4 million babies die in the first week of their life, the so called neonatal period.
 
Almost all the neonatal deaths (calculated as the neonatal mortality rate; NMR) occur in low- or middle income countries.

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Adolescent pregnancy

Today 2.7 million girls give birth before the age of 15. The most direct danger of adolescent pregnancy is the risk of maternal death.

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